pothos plant in a hanging basket with its glossy green and yellow leaves and trailing stems

How to Turn Your Home into a Jungle with These 5 Amazing Vine House Plants

Vine house plants are plants that grow long stems that can hang down or climb up supports.
Vine house plants can make your home more beautiful, healthy, and relaxing.
Some of the most popular and easy-to-care-for vine house plants are pothos, philodendron, ivy, devil’s ivy, and inch plant.
Each vine house plant has its own features, care, and tips that you need to know.
This article will teach you everything you need to know about these five amazing vine house plants.

Did you know that vine house plants can make your home more beautiful, healthy, and relaxing? Vine house plants are plants that have trailing or climbing stems and leaves that can cascade over the sides of pots or climb up trellises or poles. They are popular and beneficial for indoor gardening because they can:

  • Purify the air by removing toxins and producing oxygen
  • Reduce stress by creating a soothing and calming atmosphere
  • Add style by enhancing the aesthetic appeal of your home
  • Save space by growing vertically or horizontally

In this article, you will learn about the features, care, and tips of five amazing vine house plants that can turn your home into a jungle. These are:

  • Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum)
  • Ivy (Hedera)
  • Devil’s ivy (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Inch plant (Tradescantia)

First of all, let’s start with one of the most common and easy-to-care-for vine house plants, pothos.

Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

pothos plant in a hanging basket with its glossy green and yellow leaves and trailing stems

Pothos (Epipremnum aureum), also known as devil’s ivy, money plant, or golden pothos, is a tropical plant native to Southeast Asia and Australia. It is one of the most versatile and low-maintenance vine house plants that can thrive in almost any environment.

Features of Pothos

Pothos has glossy green leaves with yellow or white variegation that look like splashes of paint or drops of gold. Its stems can grow up to 12 feet long and can either hang down or climb up supports. Its leaves can vary in size and shape, from small and heart-shaped to large and oval.

Pothos is not only beautiful, but also beneficial for your health. It is one of the best plants for purifying the air, as it can remove formaldehyde, benzene, xylene, and carbon monoxide from the air. It can also increase the humidity and oxygen levels in your home, which can help prevent dry skin, sore throat, and respiratory problems.

Care of Pothos

Pothos is very easy to care for, as it can tolerate low light, low water, and low fertilizer. Here are some tips on how to care for pothos:

  • Light: Pothos can survive in low light, but prefers bright indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves.
  • Water: Water pothos when the top inch of soil feels dry, but do not overwater, as it can cause root rot. Drain the excess water from the saucer after watering.
  • Soil: Use a well-draining potting mix that contains peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize pothos once a month during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength.
  • Pruning: Prune pothos regularly to maintain its shape and size. Cut off any dead, damaged, or yellow leaves and stems.
  • Propagation: Propagate pothos by taking stem cuttings with at least one leaf and a node and placing them in water or soil. They will root easily and quickly.
  • Pests and Diseases: Pothos is generally pest and disease resistant, but watch out for mealybugs, spider mites, and scale insects. Wipe the leaves with a damp cloth or spray with insecticidal soap to get rid of them.

Tips for Pothos

Here are some extra tips on how to make the most of your pothos:

  • Pothos is toxic to pets, so keep it out of their reach.
  • Pothos can grow in water or soil, but water-grown pothos may not adapt well to soil later.
  • Pothos can be trained to climb or hang from a basket, a trellis, a pole, or a wall. You can use hooks, nails, or clips to secure the stems.
  • Pothos can be combined with other plants in a container or a terrarium, as long as they have similar light and water requirements.

Pothos is a versatile and low-maintenance vine house plant that can add a touch of greenery and beauty to any home. Next, we will look at another popular vine house plant, philodendron.

Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum)

types of vine house plants

Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum), also known as heartleaf philodendron, sweetheart plant, or parlor ivy, is a tropical plant native to Central and South America. It is another common and easy-to-care-for vine house plant that has heart-shaped leaves and various colors and patterns.

Features of Philodendron

Philodendron has heart-shaped green leaves that can range from dark to light green, or even have pink, red, or white variegation. Its stems can grow up to 10 feet long and can either hang down or climb up supports. Its leaves can vary in size and shape, from small and round to large and pointed.

Philodendron is not only colorful, but also beneficial for your health. It is one of the best plants for purifying the air, as it can remove formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene from the air. It can also increase the humidity and oxygen levels in your home, which can help prevent dry skin, sore throat, and respiratory problems.

Care of Philodendron

Philodendron is very easy to care for, as it can survive in low light, low water, and low fertilizer. Here are some tips on how to care for philodendron:

  • Light: Philodendron can survive in low light, but prefers bright indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can burn the leaves.
  • Water: Water philodendron when the top inch of soil feels dry, but do not overwater, as it can cause root rot. Drain the excess water from the saucer after watering.
  • Soil: Use a well-draining potting mix that contains peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize philodendron once a month during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength.
  • Pruning: Prune philodendron regularly to maintain its shape and size. Cut off any dead, damaged, or yellow leaves and stems.
  • Propagation: Propagate philodendron by taking stem cuttings with at least one leaf and a node and placing them in water or soil. They will root easily and quickly.
  • Pests and Diseases: Philodendron is generally pest and disease resistant, but watch out for aphids, thrips, and fungus gnats. Wipe the leaves with a damp cloth or spray with insecticidal soap to get rid of them.

Tips for Philodendron

Here are some extra tips on how to make the most of your philodendron:

  • Philodendron is toxic to pets, so keep it out of their reach.
  • Philodendron can grow in water or soil, but water-grown philodendron may not adapt well to soil later.
  • Philodendron can be trained to climb or hang from a basket, a trellis, a pole, or a wall. You can use hooks, nails, or clips to secure the stems.
  • Philodendron can be combined with other plants in a container or a terrarium, as long as they have similar light and water requirements.

Philodendron is a colorful and easy-to-care-for vine house plant that can brighten up any home. Next, we will look at another classic vine house plant, ivy.

Ivy (Hedera)

types of vine house plants

Ivy (Hedera) is a group of evergreen vine plants with lobed or palmate leaves and different cultivars. It is one of the most popular and versatile vine house plants that can cascade over the sides of pots or climb up trellises or poles.

Features of Ivy

Ivy has green leaves that can have different shapes, sizes, and colors, depending on the cultivar. Some of the most common ivy cultivars are:

  • English ivy (Hedera helix): It has dark green leaves with white veins and can grow up to 100 feet long. It is the most widely grown ivy and can tolerate cold and shade.
  • Irish ivy (Hedera hibernica): It has larger and glossier leaves than English ivy and can grow up to 50 feet long. It is more tolerant of heat and sun than English ivy.
  • Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata): It is not a true ivy, but a member of the grape family. It has three-lobed leaves that turn red in autumn and can grow up to 60 feet long. It is more tolerant of dry and alkaline soil than true ivies.
  • Persian ivy (Hedera colchica): It has the largest leaves of all ivies, up to 10 inches long. It has dark green leaves with yellow veins and can grow up to 40 feet long. It is more tolerant of heat and sun than English ivy.

Ivy is not only versatile, but also beneficial for your health. It is one of the best plants for purifying the air, as it can remove formaldehyde, benzene, and carbon monoxide from the air. It can also increase the humidity and oxygen levels in your home, which can help prevent dry skin, sore throat, and respiratory problems.

Care of Ivy

Ivy is very easy to care for, as it can adapt to different light, water, and soil conditions. Here are some tips on how to care for ivy:

  • Light: Ivy can grow in shade or sun, but prefers bright indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can bleach the leaves.
  • Water: Water ivy when the top inch of soil feels dry, but do not overwater, as it can cause root rot. Drain the excess water from the saucer after watering.
  • Soil: Use a well-draining potting mix that contains peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize ivy once a month during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength.
  • Pruning: Prune ivy regularly to maintain its shape and size. Cut off any dead, damaged, or yellow leaves and stems.
  • Propagation: Propagate ivy by taking stem cuttings with at least one leaf and a node and placing them in water or soil. They will root easily and quickly.
  • Pests and Diseases: Ivy is generally pest and disease resistant, but watch out for spider mites, scale insects, and leaf spot. Wipe the leaves with a damp cloth or spray with insecticidal soap to get rid of them.

Tips for Ivy

Here are some extra tips on how to make the most of your ivy:

  • Ivy is toxic to pets, so keep it out of their reach.
  • Ivy can grow in water or soil, but water-grown ivy may not adapt well to soil later.
  • Ivy can be trained to climb or hang from a basket, a trellis, a pole, or a wall. You can use hooks, nails, or clips to secure the stems.
  • Ivy can be combined with other plants in a container or a terrarium, as long as they have similar light and water requirements.

Ivy is a classic and versatile vine house plant that can add a touch of elegance and charm to any home. Next, we will look at another name for pothos, devil’s ivy.

Devil’s Ivy (Epipremnum aureum)

types of vine house plants

Devil’s ivy (Epipremnum aureum) is another name for pothos, as we discussed earlier. It is a tropical plant native to Southeast Asia and Australia. It is one of the most versatile and low-maintenance vine house plants that can thrive in almost any environment.

Features of Devil’s Ivy

Devil’s ivy has glossy green leaves with yellow or white variegation that look like splashes of paint or drops of gold. Its stems can grow up to 12 feet long and can either hang down or climb up supports. Its leaves can vary in size and shape, from small and heart-shaped to large and oval.

Devil’s ivy is not only beautiful, but also beneficial for your health. It is one of the best plants for purifying the air, as it can remove formaldehyde, benzene, xylene, and carbon monoxide from the air. It can also increase the humidity and oxygen levels in your home, which can help prevent dry skin, sore throat, and respiratory problems.

Care of Devil’s Ivy

Devil’s ivy is very easy to care for, as it can tolerate low light, low water, and low fertilizer. Here are some tips on how to care for devil’s ivy:

  • Light: Devil’s ivy can survive in low light, but prefers bright indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can scorch the leaves.
  • Water: Water devil’s ivy when the top inch of soil feels dry, but do not overwater, as it can cause root rot. Drain the excess water from the saucer after watering.
  • Soil: Use a well-draining potting mix that contains peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize devil’s ivy once a month during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength.
  • Pruning: Prune devil’s ivy regularly to maintain its shape and size. Cut off any dead, damaged, or yellow leaves and stems.
  • Propagation: Propagate devil’s ivy by taking stem cuttings with at least one leaf and a node and placing them in water or soil. They will root easily and quickly.
  • Pests and Diseases: Devil’s ivy is generally pest and disease resistant, but watch out for mealybugs, spider mites, and scale insects. Wipe the leaves with a damp cloth or spray with insecticidal soap to get rid of them.

Tips for Devil’s Ivy

Here are some extra tips on how to make the most of your devil’s ivy:

  • Devil’s ivy is toxic to pets, so keep it out of their reach.
  • Devil’s ivy can grow in water or soil, but water-grown devil’s ivy may not adapt well to soil later.
  • Devil’s ivy can be trained to climb or hang from a basket, a trellis, a pole, or a wall. You can use hooks, nails, or clips to secure the stems.
  • Devil’s ivy can be combined with other plants in a container or a terrarium, as long as they have similar light and water requirements.

Devil’s ivy is a versatile and low-maintenance vine house plant that can add a touch of greenery and beauty to any home. Finally, we will look at another colorful vine house plant, inch plant.

Inch Plant (Tradescantia)

inch plant in a pot with its colorful bushy foliage and small flowers and trailing stems

Inch plant (Tradescantia) is an easy to grow indoor vine plant that has colorful bushy foliage and trailing stems. It is a genus of plants that includes several species and cultivars, such as:

  • Wandering Jew (Tradescantia zebrina): It has striped or variegated leaves in green, purple, pink, or silver. It can grow up to 6 feet long and has small purple flowers.
  • Spiderwort (Tradescantia virginiana): It has green or purple leaves and clusters of blue, purple, pink, or white flowers. It can grow up to 3 feet tall and wide.
  • Purple Heart (Tradescantia pallida): It has purple leaves and stems and small pink flowers. It can grow up to 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide.

Features of Inch Plant

Inch plant has green, purple, pink, or variegated leaves and small flowers that can add a splash of color to your home. Its stems can grow up to 6 feet long and can either hang down or climb up supports. Its leaves and flowers can vary in size and shape, depending on the species and cultivar.

Inch plant is not only colorful, but also beneficial for your health. It is one of the best plants for purifying the air, as it can remove formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene from the air. It can also increase the humidity and oxygen levels in your home, which can help prevent dry skin, sore throat, and respiratory problems.

Care of Inch Plant

Inch plant is very easy to care for, as it can adapt to different light, water, and soil conditions. Here are some tips on how to care for inch plant:

  • Light: Inch plant can grow in shade or sun, but prefers bright indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can fade the colors of the leaves.
  • Water: Water inch plant when the top inch of soil feels dry, but do not overwater, as it can cause root rot. Drain the excess water from the saucer after watering.
  • Soil: Use a well-draining potting mix that contains peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize inch plant once a month during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted to half strength.
  • Pruning: Prune inch plant regularly to maintain its shape and size. Cut off any dead, damaged, or yellow leaves and stems.
  • Propagation: Propagate inch plant by taking stem cuttings with at least one leaf and a node and placing them in water or soil. They will root easily and quickly.
  • Pests and Diseases: Inch plant is generally pest and disease resistant, but watch out for spider mites, mealybugs, and whiteflies. Wipe the leaves with a damp cloth or spray with insecticidal soap to get rid of them.

Tips for Inch Plant

Here are some extra tips on how to make the most of your inch plant:

  • Inch plant is non-toxic to pets, so you can safely keep it around them.
  • Inch plant can grow in water or soil, but water-grown inch plant may not adapt well to soil later.
  • Inch plant can be trained to climb or hang from a basket, a shelf, or a plant stand. You can use hooks, nails, or clips to secure the stems.
  • Inch plant can be combined with other plants in a container or a terrarium, as long as they have similar light and water requirements.

Inch plant is a colorful and easy-to-care-for vine house plant that can brighten up any home.

Conclusion

In this article, you have learned about the features, care, and tips of five amazing vine house plants that can turn your home into a jungle. These are:

  • Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum)
  • Ivy (Hedera)
  • Devil’s ivy (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Inch plant (Tradescantia)

Each of these vine house plants has its own advantages and disadvantages, but they all share some common characteristics, such as:

  • They can purify the air, reduce stress, add style, and save space
  • They can grow in low light, low water, and low fertilizer
  • They can be propagated by stem cuttings in water or soil
  • They can be trained to climb or hang from different supports
  • They can be combined with other plants in a container or a terrarium

To summarize, vine house plants are plants that have trailing or climbing stems and leaves that can cascade over the sides of pots or climb up trellises or poles. They are popular and beneficial for indoor gardening because they can make your home more beautiful, healthy, and relaxing.

We hope that this article has helped you learn more about these five amazing vine house plants and inspired you to try them out in your home. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave them below. Thank you for reading and happy gardening!

About The Author

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Samantha
Samantha

I'm Samantha, a plant enthusiast who has been growing plants for years. I believe that plants can make our lives better, both physically and mentally. I started growit.wiki to share my knowledge about how to grow plants. I want to help others enjoy the beauty and benefits of plants.

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