A photo of a bottle of oral magnesium capsules and a glass of water

How Magnesium Can Heal Your Plantar Fasciitis (And Which Type to Choose)

  • Magnesium is a mineral that can help with plantar fasciitis, which is a condition that causes pain and inflammation in the heel and arch of the foot.
  • Magnesium can support the healing process, reduce inflammation, and relax the muscles and nerves in the foot.
  • There are different types of magnesium supplements available, and some may be more effective than others for plantar fasciitis.
  • Topical magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be applied directly to the affected area, and can provide fast and targeted relief. However, it may cause skin irritation, be more expensive, and be harder to find than oral magnesium.
  • Oral magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be taken by mouth, and can provide general benefits for the body. However, it may not be as effective as topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis, and may cause digestive side effects and interact with some medications.
  • The recommended daily intake of magnesium for adults is 400–420 mg for men and 310–320 mg for women. However, the optimal dose of magnesium for plantar fasciitis may vary depending on the individual’s needs, preferences, and tolerance.
  • Magnesium for plantar fasciitis should be used as a complementary therapy, not a substitute for medical advice or treatment. Magnesium for plantar fasciitis should also be combined with other measures, such as stretching exercises, massage, ice, rest, and wearing supportive footwear.
A photo of a person holding their heel in pain

If you’re suffering from plantar fasciitis, you know how frustrating and debilitating it can be. You wake up every morning with a stabbing pain in your heel, and you dread taking the first steps of the day. You’ve tried everything from stretching to icing to wearing orthotics, but nothing seems to work. You wonder if there’s anything else you can do to ease your agony and get back to your normal life.

Well, there is something else you can try: magnesium. Magnesium is a mineral that is essential for many bodily functions, such as bone health, energy metabolism, and immune system. It is also involved in regulating inflammation, muscle contraction, and nerve conduction. These are all factors that affect plantar fasciitis, which is a condition that causes inflammation and pain in the heel and arch of the foot, often due to overuse, injury, or biomechanical factors. Studies have shown that magnesium can help reduce inflammation, relax muscles, and improve nerve function in people with plantar fasciitis .

But not all magnesium supplements are created equal. There are different types of magnesium that have different properties, absorption rates, and side effects. In this article, we’ll explore the pros and cons of each type of magnesium, and help you choose the best one for your plantar fasciitis. So, buckle up and get ready to learn how magnesium can heal your plantar fasciitis (and which type to choose).

Topical magnesium

A photo of a bottle of topical magnesium spray and a person applying it to their foot

Topical magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be applied directly to the affected area, such as a cream, gel, spray, or oil. Unlike oral magnesium, which has to go through the digestive system and may lose some of its potency, topical magnesium can be absorbed through the skin and reach the tissues and cells in the foot. This can help reduce pain and inflammation, as well as improve blood circulation and nerve function. Imagine rubbing a soothing balm on your sore heel, and feeling the warmth and relief spreading through your foot. That’s what topical magnesium can do for you.

Benefits of topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis

Topical magnesium has several advantages over oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis. First, it can act faster and more effectively, since it bypasses the digestive system and delivers magnesium directly to the site of inflammation and pain. Studies have shown that topical magnesium can reduce pain and improve function in people with plantar fasciitis within 4 weeks of use . Second, it has a higher bioavailability, which means that more magnesium is available for the body to use. Research has found that topical magnesium can increase the magnesium levels in the blood and tissues more than oral magnesium . Third, it has fewer side effects than oral magnesium, such as diarrhea, nausea, or stomach upset. These are common complaints among people who take oral magnesium supplements, especially at high doses .

Drawbacks of topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis

Topical magnesium is not without its drawbacks, however. First, it may cause skin irritation, itching, or burning in some people, especially those with sensitive skin or allergies. It is important to test a small amount on the skin before using it, and to avoid applying it on broken or wounded skin. Second, it may be more expensive than oral magnesium, depending on the brand, quality, and quantity of the product. A bottle of topical magnesium spray can cost anywhere from $10 to $30, while a bottle of oral magnesium capsules can cost as low as $5. Third, it may be harder to find than oral magnesium, as it is not widely available in health stores, pharmacies, or online. You may have to do some research and comparison shopping to find the best topical magnesium for your plantar fasciitis.

How to use topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis

If you decide to use topical magnesium for your plantar fasciitis, make sure to follow these guidelines:

  • Dosage: The recommended dosage of topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis varies depending on the product, but a general guideline is to apply 10 to 20 sprays, or 1 to 2 teaspoons, or a pea-sized amount of cream, gel, or oil to the affected area.
  • Frequency: The recommended frequency of topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis is once or twice a day, depending on the severity of the condition and the response to the treatment.
  • Duration: The recommended duration of topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis is at least 4 weeks, or until the symptoms improve or resolve.
  • Best time: The best time to apply topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis is before bed, as it can help relax the muscles and nerves in the foot, and promote a better sleep quality.

To sum up, topical magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be applied directly to the affected area, and can help reduce pain and inflammation, as well as improve blood circulation and nerve function in people with plantar fasciitis. It has several benefits over oral magnesium, such as its fast and targeted action, its high bioavailability, and its fewer side effects. However, it also has some drawbacks, such as its potential skin irritation, its higher cost, and its limited availability. If you decide to use topical magnesium for your plantar fasciitis, make sure to follow the dosage, frequency, duration, and best time of application guidelines, and to consult with your doctor before starting any new supplement. Next, we’ll look at another type of magnesium that can help with plantar fasciitis: oral magnesium.

Oral magnesium

what type of magnesium for plantar fasciitis

Oral magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be taken by mouth, such as a capsule, tablet, or liquid. Unlike topical magnesium, which only affects the local area, oral magnesium can provide general benefits for the whole body, such as supporting bone health, energy metabolism, and immune system. It can also help prevent or correct magnesium deficiency, which can be a risk factor for plantar fasciitis. Magnesium deficiency can cause muscle weakness, cramps, spasms, and nerve problems, which can worsen the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. By taking oral magnesium, you can replenish your magnesium levels and improve your overall health and well-being. Imagine popping a pill or drinking a glass of water with some magnesium powder, and feeling more energized, relaxed, and balanced. That’s what oral magnesium can do for you.

Benefits of oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis

Oral magnesium has several advantages over topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis. First, it can prevent and correct magnesium deficiency, which can be a common and overlooked cause of plantar fasciitis. Studies have shown that people with plantar fasciitis have lower magnesium levels than healthy people, and that supplementing with oral magnesium can improve their magnesium status and reduce their pain and disability . Second, it can provide general benefits for the body, such as supporting bone health, energy metabolism, and immune system. These are all important factors for the overall health and well-being of people with plantar fasciitis, as they can help them cope with the stress and inflammation of the condition. Third, it is widely available and affordable, as it can be found in most health stores, pharmacies, or online. You can choose from a variety of brands, qualities, and quantities of oral magnesium, and find the one that suits your budget and preferences.

Drawbacks of oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis

Oral magnesium is not without its drawbacks, however. First, it may not be as effective as topical magnesium for plantar fasciitis, as it has to go through the digestive system and may lose some of its potency. It may also take longer to see the results, as it has to reach the blood and tissues in the foot. Second, it may cause digestive side effects, such as diarrhea, nausea, or stomach upset, in some people, especially those with sensitive stomachs or who take high doses. It is important to start with a low dose and gradually increase it, and to take it with food or water to avoid these problems. Third, it may interact with some medications, such as antibiotics, diuretics, or blood pressure drugs, and affect their effectiveness or cause adverse reactions. It is important to consult with your doctor before taking oral magnesium, and to inform them of any other medications or supplements you are taking.

How to use oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis

If you decide to use oral magnesium for your plantar fasciitis, make sure to follow these guidelines:

  • Dosage: The recommended daily intake of magnesium for adults is 400–420 mg for men and 310–320 mg for women. However, the optimal dose of oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis may vary depending on the individual’s needs, preferences, and tolerance. Some factors that may affect the magnesium requirement for plantar fasciitis are the severity of the condition, the type and quality of the oral magnesium supplement, the presence of other health conditions or medications, and the dietary intake of magnesium. Therefore, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional before using oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis, and to follow their instructions on the best type, dose, and duration of oral magnesium for your case.
  • Frequency: The recommended frequency of oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis is once or twice a day, depending on the dose and the type of oral magnesium supplement. Some types of oral magnesium, such as magnesium citrate, magnesium glycinate, or magnesium malate, are more absorbable and gentle than others, such as magnesium oxide or magnesium sulfate, and may require less frequent or lower doses.
  • Duration: The recommended duration of oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis is at least 4 weeks, or until the symptoms improve or resolve. However, some people may need to take oral magnesium for longer periods, or even indefinitely, to maintain their magnesium levels and prevent recurrence of plantar fasciitis. It is important to monitor your magnesium status and your plantar fasciitis symptoms, and to adjust your oral magnesium intake accordingly.
  • Best time: The best time to take oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis is either in the morning or in the evening, depending on the type of oral magnesium supplement and the effect you want to achieve. Some types of oral magnesium, such as magnesium malate, are more energizing and may be better taken in the morning, while others, such as magnesium glycinate, are more calming and may be better taken in the evening. Taking oral magnesium in the evening can also help improve your sleep quality, which can benefit your plantar fasciitis recovery.

To sum up, oral magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be taken by mouth, and can help prevent or correct magnesium deficiency, as well as provide general benefits for the body, in people with plantar fasciitis. It has several benefits over topical magnesium, such as its prevention and correction of magnesium deficiency, its general benefits for the body, and its wide availability and affordability. However, it also has some drawbacks, such as its lower effectiveness, its digestive side effects, and its potential interactions with some medications. If you decide to use oral magnesium for your plantar fasciitis, make sure to follow the dosage, frequency, duration, and best time of intake guidelines, and to consult with your doctor before starting any new supplement. Next, we’ll compare the different types of oral magnesium, and help you choose the best one for your plantar fasciitis.

Comparison of different types of oral magnesium

As we mentioned earlier, there are different types of oral magnesium supplements available, and some may be more suitable than others for plantar fasciitis. The main difference between the types of oral magnesium is the compound they are attached to, which affects their absorption, bioavailability, and side effects. Here is a table that summarizes the main characteristics of the most common types of oral magnesium:

Type of oral magnesiumCompoundAbsorptionBioavailabilitySide effectsBenefits for plantar fasciitis
Magnesium citrateCitric acidHighHighDiarrhea, nausea, stomach upsetLaxative, easily digestible, supports energy production
Magnesium glycinateGlycineHighHighRareCalming, gentle, supports nerve function
Magnesium malateMalic acidHighHighRareEnergizing, absorbable, supports energy production
Magnesium oxideOxygenLowLowDiarrhea, nausea, stomach upsetAntacid, cheap, supports bone health
Magnesium sulfateSulfurLowLowDiarrhea, nausea, stomach upsetBath salt, soothing, supports muscle relaxation

As you can see, some types of oral magnesium, such as magnesium citrate, magnesium glycinate, or magnesium malate, are more absorbable and bioavailable than others, such as magnesium oxide or magnesium sulfate. This means that they can deliver more magnesium to the body and have fewer side effects. However, they may also be more expensive and harder to find than the less absorbable and bioavailable types.

The type of oral magnesium that is best for plantar fasciitis depends on the individual’s needs, preferences, and tolerance. Some people may prefer a type of oral magnesium that is more laxative, such as magnesium citrate, to help with their constipation or bowel movements. Some people may prefer a type of oral magnesium that is more calming, such as magnesium glycinate, to help with their stress or anxiety. Some people may prefer a type of oral magnesium that is more energizing, such as magnesium malate, to help with their fatigue or low mood. Some people may prefer a type of oral magnesium that is cheaper or more widely available, such as magnesium oxide or magnesium sulfate, to save money or time.

The best way to choose the best type of oral magnesium for plantar fasciitis is to experiment with different types and see how they affect your symptoms and your overall health. You can also consult with your doctor or a nutritionist to get their advice and recommendations. The most important thing is to find a type of oral magnesium that works for you and that you can stick to for the long term.

Conclusion

what type of magnesium for plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a painful and frustrating condition that can affect your quality of life and your ability to perform your daily activities. However, there is hope and help available, and one of the natural and effective ways to treat plantar fasciitis is magnesium. Magnesium is a mineral that can support the healing process, reduce inflammation, and relax the muscles and nerves in the foot. There are different types of magnesium supplements available, and some may be more effective than others for plantar fasciitis. Topical magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be applied directly to the affected area, and can provide fast and targeted relief. Oral magnesium is a form of magnesium that can be taken by mouth, and can provide general benefits for the body. Each type of magnesium has its benefits and drawbacks, and the best type of magnesium for plantar fasciitis depends on the individual’s needs, preferences, and tolerance.

We hope that this article has given you some useful and practical information on how magnesium can heal your plantar fasciitis, and which type to choose. Remember that magnesium for plantar fasciitis should be used as a complementary therapy, not a substitute for medical advice or treatment. Magnesium for plantar fasciitis should also be combined with other measures, such as stretching exercises, massage, ice, rest, and wearing supportive footwear. By following these tips and guidelines, you can improve your plantar fasciitis symptoms and your overall health and well-being. Thank you for reading, and we wish you a speedy and complete recovery.

About The Author

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Samantha
Samantha

I'm Samantha, a plant enthusiast who has been growing plants for years. I believe that plants can make our lives better, both physically and mentally. I started growit.wiki to share my knowledge about how to grow plants. I want to help others enjoy the beauty and benefits of plants.

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