types of ginger plants in florida

How to Grow and Enjoy 18 Types of Ginger Plants in Florida

  • Ginger is a versatile plant that has edible, medicinal, and ornamental uses.
  • Florida’s subtropical climate is ideal for growing many varieties of ginger plants.
  • Ginger plants require rich, moist soil, filtered sunlight, and regular watering and fertilizing.
  • Ginger plants can be harvested, stored, and propagated by using their rhizomes, stems, leaves, or flowers.
  • There are 18 types of ginger plants that you can grow and enjoy in Florida, each with its own characteristics, uses, and cultivation tips.

What is Ginger and Why is it Good for You?

types of ginger plants in florida

Ginger is a tropical plant that belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which includes other spices such as turmeric, cardamom, and galangal. The word ginger comes from the Sanskrit word “singabera”, which means “shaped like a horn”. Ginger originated in Southeast Asia, and was introduced to other parts of the world by traders and explorers. Today, ginger is widely cultivated and consumed in many countries, especially in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean.

The most commonly used part of the ginger plant is the rhizome, which is the underground stem that grows horizontally and produces roots and shoots. The rhizome has a yellowish-brown skin and a light-yellow to ivory-colored flesh. The rhizome can be peeled, sliced, grated, minced, or powdered, and used for cooking and medicine. The rhizome has a spicy, pungent, and aromatic flavor that adds a zing to many dishes, such as soups, curries, stir-fries, teas, and desserts.

The stems and leaves of the ginger plant are also edible, and can be used for flavoring or garnishing. The stems are green and hollow, and the leaves are long and narrow. The stems and leaves have a milder flavor than the rhizome, and can be chopped, boiled, or brewed. The stems and leaves can also be used for making ginger beer, a fermented drink that is popular in the Caribbean.

The flowers of the ginger plant are not only beautiful, but also edible and medicinal. The flowers are usually small and inconspicuous, but some varieties have showy and colorful inflorescences that attract pollinators and humans alike. The flowers have a sweet, floral, and gingery fragrance that can be used for perfumes and aromatherapy. The flowers can also be eaten raw, cooked, or candied, and used for salads, desserts, or decorations.

Ginger is not only delicious, but also good for you. Ginger has many health benefits, such as:

  • Anti-inflammatory: Ginger contains gingerols, which are compounds that have anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Ginger can help reduce pain, swelling, and stiffness caused by arthritis, muscle soreness, headaches, and menstrual cramps.
  • Antioxidant: Ginger contains antioxidants, which are substances that protect the cells from damage caused by free radicals. Ginger can help prevent or delay aging, cancer, and chronic diseases.
  • Digestive: Ginger stimulates the production of saliva, bile, and gastric juices, which aid in digestion and absorption of nutrients. Ginger can help relieve nausea, vomiting, motion sickness, indigestion, gas, bloating, and constipation.
  • Immune-boosting: Ginger boosts the immune system by activating the white blood cells, which fight against infections and diseases. Ginger can help prevent or treat colds, flu, sore throat, cough, and fever.

Ginger can be used for food, medicine, and beauty in many ways, such as:

  • Food: You can use fresh, dried, or powdered ginger to flavor your dishes, or make ginger tea, ginger ale, ginger beer, ginger candy, ginger cookies, ginger cake, or ginger ice cream.
  • Medicine: You can use ginger capsules, tablets, tinctures, oils, or extracts to treat various ailments, or make ginger compresses, poultices, or baths to soothe your body.
  • Beauty: You can use ginger juice, pulp, or oil to make ginger masks, scrubs, or lotions to improve your skin, hair, and nails.

As you can see, ginger is a versatile plant that has many uses and benefits. But did you know that there are many types of ginger plants that you can grow and enjoy in your own garden? In the next section, we will show you how to grow ginger plants in Florida, and introduce you to 18 types of ginger plants that you can choose from.

How to Grow Ginger Plants in Florida

types of ginger plants in florida

Florida is a paradise for ginger lovers, as the subtropical climate allows many varieties of ginger plants to thrive. Ginger plants are easy to grow and care for, as long as you provide them with the right conditions. Here are some general requirements for growing ginger plants in Florida:

  • Climate: Ginger plants prefer warm and humid weather, and cannot tolerate frost or freezing temperatures. The ideal temperature range for ginger plants is between 68°F and 86°F. Ginger plants can be grown outdoors in USDA zones 9 to 11, or indoors in containers in cooler zones.
  • Soil: Ginger plants need rich, well-drained, and slightly acidic soil, with a pH level between 5.5 and 6.5. You can amend the soil with organic matter, such as compost, manure, or peat moss, to improve its fertility and drainage. You can also mulch the soil with straw, leaves, or wood chips, to retain moisture and prevent weeds.
  • Water: Ginger plants need regular and consistent watering, especially during the growing season. The soil should be kept moist, but not soggy, as ginger plants are prone to root rot. You can water ginger plants once or twice a week, depending on the weather and soil conditions. You can reduce watering in the winter, when the plants are dormant.
  • Fertilizer: Ginger plants need moderate to high amounts of fertilizer, especially during the growing season. You can feed ginger plants with a balanced organic fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, every two to four weeks, or use a slow-release fertilizer at the beginning of the season. You can also supplement the fertilizer with compost tea, fish emulsion, or seaweed extract, to provide extra nutrients and boost growth.
  • Sunlight: Ginger plants need filtered or partial sunlight, as they are sensitive to direct and intense sunlight. You can grow ginger plants in a location that receives morning sun and afternoon shade, or under the canopy of taller plants or trees. You can also use a shade cloth or a lattice to protect ginger plants from scorching sun.

The best time to plant ginger rhizomes is in the spring, after the last frost, or in the fall, before the first frost. You can buy ginger rhizomes from a nursery, a grocery store, or online, or use your own ginger rhizomes that have sprouted. You can prepare and plant ginger rhizomes by following these steps:

  • Choose healthy and plump ginger rhizomes that have buds or eyes, which are the small bumps or knobs on the surface of the rhizome. Avoid ginger rhizomes that are shriveled, moldy, or rotten.
  • Soak the ginger rhizomes in water for a few hours, or overnight, to hydrate them and remove any chemicals or pesticides. You can also add some hydrogen peroxide or baking soda to the water, to prevent fungal infections.
  • Cut the ginger rhizomes into pieces, each with at least one bud or eye. You can use a sharp knife or a pair of scissors, and make sure to sterilize the tool before and after cutting. You can also dust the cut ends with some cinnamon or fungicide, to prevent rotting.
  • Let the ginger rhizome pieces dry and heal for a day or two, in a cool and dry place, away from direct sunlight. This will allow the cut ends to form a protective layer or callus, which will prevent moisture loss and infection.
  • Plant the ginger rhizome pieces about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can plant them horizontally or vertically, with the buds or eyes facing up. You can also plant them in containers, with drainage holes, and filled with potting mix. You can use pots that are at least 12 inches wide and deep, and place them in a sunny and warm spot.
  • Water the ginger rhizome pieces thoroughly, and keep the soil moist, but not soggy. You can expect the ginger plants to sprout in a few weeks, depending on the temperature and moisture.

You can harvest ginger rhizomes when the plants are mature, which is usually after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest ginger rhizomes earlier, when the plants are young, which is usually after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. Young ginger rhizomes are tender and mild, while mature ginger rhizomes are fibrous and spicy. You can harvest ginger rhizomes by following these steps:

  • Dig up the ginger rhizomes carefully, using a spade, a fork, or your hands, and try not to damage the rhizomes or the roots. You can dig up the whole plant, or just a part of it, and leave the rest in the ground for later harvesting.
  • Wash the ginger rhizomes gently, using water and a brush, and remove any dirt, soil, or debris. You can peel the ginger rhizomes if you want, or leave the skin on, as it is edible and nutritious.
  • Dry the ginger rhizomes for a few hours, or until they are completely dry, in a warm and airy place, away from direct sunlight. This will prevent mold and decay, and extend the shelf life of the rhizomes.
  • Store the ginger rhizomes in an airtight container, such as a ziplock bag, a glass jar, or a plastic tub, and keep them in a cool and dry place, such as a refrigerator, a freezer, or a pantry. You can store fresh ginger rhizomes for up to three weeks in the refrigerator, up to six months in the freezer, or up to a year in the pantry.
  • Preserve the ginger rhizomes by pickling, candying, or drying them. You can pickle ginger rhizomes by soaking them in vinegar, sugar, and salt, and storing them in the refrigerator for up to a year. You can candy ginger rhizomes by boiling them in sugar syrup, and drying them in the oven or a dehydrator, and storing them in an airtight container for up to a year. You can dry ginger rhizomes by slicing them thinly, and drying them in the oven or a dehydrator, and storing them in an airtight container for up to a year.

You can propagate ginger plants by using their rhizomes, stems, leaves, or flowers. You can propagate ginger plants by following these methods:

  • Division: You can divide the ginger rhizomes into smaller pieces, each with at least one bud or eye, and plant them in the soil or in containers, as described above. You can do this in the spring or in the fall, when the plants are dormant or active.
  • Cuttings: You can cut the ginger stems or leaves, and place them in water or in moist soil, until they develop roots. You can do this in the summer or in the fall, when the plants are growing or flowering.
  • Seeds: You can collect the ginger seeds, which are the small black or brown pods that form after the flowers fade, and sow them in the soil or in containers, about 1/4 inch deep, and keep them moist and warm. You can do this in the spring or in the fall, when the plants are dormant or active.

Now that you know how to grow ginger plants in Florida, let’s take a look at the 18 types of ginger plants that you can choose from.

18 Types of Ginger Plants that You Can Grow and Enjoy in Florida

types of ginger plants in florida

There are many types of ginger plants that can grow in Florida, some for their edible rhizomes and others for their ornamental flowers. Here are some of the most common ones, organized into categories based on their uses:

A. Culinary Ginger Plants

These are the ginger plants that are used for food flavoring and herbal medicine. They have spicy, pungent, and aromatic rhizomes that can be used fresh, dried, or powdered. They also have edible stems, leaves, and flowers that can be used for garnishing or brewing. Here are five types of culinary ginger plants that you can grow and enjoy in Florida:

Common NameBotanical NameHeightFlower ColorFragranceFlavorEdibility
Common GingerZingiber officinale4 feetYellowMildSpicyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Thai GingerZingiber officinale ‘Krachai’4 feetPinkMildPepperyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Mango GingerCurcuma amada3 feetYellowMildMango-likeRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
TurmericCurcuma longa3 feetYellowMildEarthyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Myoga GingerZingiber mioga3 feetWhite or pinkMildZestyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower

Common Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

This is the ginger that is used for cooking and medicine. It has yellowish-brown skin and light-yellow to ivory-colored flesh. It can grow up to 4 feet tall and produces green stems and leaves with small yellow flowers. It prefers filtered sunlight and rich, moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the rhizome to flavor soups, curries, stir-fries, teas, and desserts. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make ginger beer, ginger ale, or ginger tea.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Thai Ginger (Zingiber officinale ‘Krachai’)

This is a ginger variety with a peppery flavor that is used in Thai cuisine and medicine. It has green stems and leaves with pink flowers that have a yellow center. It can grow up to 4 feet tall and likes partial shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the rhizome to flavor salads, soups, curries, and stir-fries. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Mango Ginger (Curcuma amada)

This is a ginger variety with a mango-like flavor that is used for food and medicine. It has green stems and leaves with yellow flowers that have a purple center. It can grow up to 3 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the rhizome to flavor salads, pickles, chutneys, and curries. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa)

This is a ginger variety with a yellow-orange rhizome that is used for food, medicine, and dye. It has green stems and leaves with yellow flowers that have a cone-like shape. It can grow up to 3 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the rhizome to flavor soups, curries, rice, and desserts. You can also use the rhizome to make turmeric milk, turmeric tea, or turmeric paste. You can also use the rhizome to dye fabrics, paper, or skin. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Myoga Ginger (Zingiber mioga)

This is a ginger variety native to Japan that is used for its flowers and young shoots that have a zesty and spicy flavor. It has green stems and leaves with purple buds that produce white or pink flowers. It can grow up to 3 feet tall and likes partial shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flower buds and young shoots to flavor salads, soups, sushi, and tempura. You can also use the flower buds and young shoots to make pickles or preserves. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the flower buds and young shoots in the summer or in the fall, before they open or emerge. You can also harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

B. Medicinal Ginger Plants

These are the ginger plants that have medicinal properties and are used for food flavoring and herbal remedies. They have various flavors and fragrances that can be used to treat various ailments, such as inflammation, infection, pain, and nausea. They also have edible stems, leaves, and flowers that can be used for garnishing or brewing. Here are four types of medicinal ginger plants that you can grow and enjoy in Florida:

Common NameBotanical NameHeightFlower ColorFragranceFlavorEdibility
Shampoo GingerZingiber zerumbet10 feetRedStrongBitterRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Bitter GingerZingiber zerumbet10 feetRedStrongBitterRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Beehive GingerZingiber spectabile15 feetYellowStrongGingeryRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Hidden GingerCurcuma petiolata6 feetPink or whiteMildMildRhizome, stem, leaf, flower

Shampoo Ginger (Zingiber zerumbet)

This is a ginger variety with cone-shaped inflorescences that produce a liquid that can be used as shampoo. It has green stems and leaves with red spiral inflorescences that produce small white flowers. It can grow up to 10 feet tall and likes bright and filtered light and warm soil.

  • How to use: You can use the liquid from the inflorescences to wash your hair, as it has cleansing, conditioning, and antiseptic properties. You can also use the rhizome to flavor food and make herbal medicine, as it has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the inflorescences when they are mature and full of liquid, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Bitter Ginger (Zingiber zerumbet)

This is a ginger variety with a bitter taste that is used for food flavoring and appetizers. It has green stems and leaves with red spiral inflorescences that produce small white flowers. It can grow up to 10 feet tall and likes bright and filtered light and warm soil.

  • How to use: You can use the rhizome to flavor salads, soups, curries, and stir-fries, as it has a bitter and refreshing taste that stimulates the appetite. You can also use the rhizome to make herbal medicine, as it has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Beehive Ginger (Zingiber spectabile)

This is a ginger variety with unique beehive-like yellow inflorescences that turn red when mature and have a strong gingery fragrance. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 15 feet tall and likes partial shade and humid climate.

  • How to use: You can use the inflorescences to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the inflorescences to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a long-lasting fragrance and color. You can also use the rhizome to flavor food, as it has a gingery taste. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the inflorescences when they are mature and full of fragrance, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Hidden Ginger (Curcuma petiolata)

This is a ginger variety with pink or white flowers that are hidden under green bracts. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 6 feet tall and likes partial shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the rhizome to make herbal medicine, as it has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. You can also use the rhizome to flavor food, as it has a mild taste. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

C. Ornamental Ginger Plants

These are the ginger plants that are grown for their showy and colorful flowers that can be used for ornamental and cut flower purposes. They have various shapes, sizes, and colors of flowers that can brighten up any garden or vase. They also have edible stems, leaves, and flowers that can be used for garnishing or brewing. Here are nine types of ornamental ginger plants that you can grow and enjoy in Florida:

Common NameBotanical NameHeightFlower ColorFragranceFlavorEdibility
Crepe GingerCheilocostus speciosus12 feetWhiteMildPungentFlower, bud
Butterfly GingerHedychium coronarium8 feetWhiteSweetMildRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Shell GingerAlpinia zerumbet10 feetPink and whiteMildLemonyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Dancing Ladies GingerGlobba winitii6 feetYellow and redMildSpicyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Yellow GingerHedychium flavescens6 feetYellowSweetMildRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Red GingerAlpinia purpurata15 feetRedMildMildRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Torch GingerEtlingera elatior20 feetRed, pink, or whiteMildSpicyRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Kahili GingerHedychium gardnerianum8 feetYellowStrongMildRhizome, stem, leaf, flower
Siam TulipCurcuma alismatifolia2 feetPink, purple, or whiteMildMildRhizome, stem, leaf, flower

Crepe Ginger (Cheilocostus speciosus)

This is a ginger variety with showy white flowers that look like crepe paper and emerge from reddish-burgundy spirals. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 12 feet tall and likes partial shade and humid climate.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers and buds to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers and buds to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a long-lasting color and shape. You can also use the flowers and buds to flavor food, as they have a pungent taste. You can also use the stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers and buds when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Butterfly Ginger (Hedychium coronarium)

This is a ginger variety with fragrant white flowers that resemble butterflies. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 8 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a sweet and long-lasting fragrance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a mild taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Shell Ginger (Alpinia zerumbet)

This is a ginger variety with green and yellow variegated leaves and pink and white flowers that look like shells. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 10 feet tall and likes partial shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a colorful and long-lasting appearance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a lemony taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the spring or in the summer.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Dancing Ladies Ginger (Globba winitii)

This is a ginger variety with yellow and red flowers that look like dancing ladies. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 6 feet tall and likes partial shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a colorful and long-lasting appearance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a spicy taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Yellow Ginger (Hedychium flavescens)

This is a ginger variety with yellow flowers that have a sweet fragrance. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 6 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a sweet and long-lasting fragrance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a mild taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Red Ginger (Alpinia purpurata)

This is a ginger variety with red flowers that have a cone-like shape. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 15 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a colorful and long-lasting appearance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a mild taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Torch Ginger (Etlingera elatior)

This is a ginger variety with red, pink, or white flowers that have a torch-like shape. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 20 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a colorful and long-lasting appearance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a spicy taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Kahili Ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum)

This is a ginger variety with yellow flowers that have a red center and a strong fragrance. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 8 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a strong and long-lasting fragrance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a mild taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Siam Tulip (Curcuma alismatifolia)

This is a ginger variety with pink, purple, or white flowers that have a tulip-like shape. It has green stems and leaves that can grow up to 2 feet tall and likes sun or shade and moist soil.

  • How to use: You can use the flowers to make herbal medicine, as they have anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and analgesic properties. You can also use the flowers to make potpourri, wreaths, or bouquets, as they have a colorful and long-lasting appearance. You can also use the flowers to flavor food, as they have a mild taste. You can also use the rhizome, stem, leaf, and flower to make tea or garnish.
  • How to grow: You can plant the rhizome in the spring or in the fall, about 2 to 4 inches deep, and 6 to 12 inches apart, in the prepared soil. You can harvest the rhizome after 8 to 10 months, or when the stems and leaves start to yellow and die back. You can also harvest the rhizome earlier, after 4 to 6 months, or when the stems and leaves are still green and fresh. You can also harvest the flowers when they are blooming, which is usually in the summer or in the fall.
  • How to propagate: You can propagate the plant by division, cuttings, or seeds, as described above.

Conclusion

Ginger is a versatile plant that has edible, medicinal, and ornamental uses. Florida’s subtropical climate is ideal for growing many varieties of ginger plants. Ginger plants require rich, moist soil, filtered sunlight, and regular watering and fertilizing. Ginger plants can be harvested, stored, and propagated by using their rhizomes, stems, leaves, or flowers. There are 18 types of ginger plants that you can grow and enjoy in Florida, each with its own characteristics, uses, and cultivation tips.

We hope this article has helped you learn more about the types of ginger plants in Florida, and inspired you to try some of them in your own garden. If you have any questions, comments, or feedback, please feel free to share them with us. We would love to hear from you. Thank you for your time and attention, and happy gardening!

About The Author

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Samantha
Samantha

I'm Samantha, a plant enthusiast who has been growing plants for years. I believe that plants can make our lives better, both physically and mentally. I started growit.wiki to share my knowledge about how to grow plants. I want to help others enjoy the beauty and benefits of plants.

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