little warty plant care

How to Grow and Care for Gasteria Little Warty: The Succulent with a Bumpy Personality

– Gasteria Little Warty is a succulent plant that has small, wart-like bumps on its leaves, which give it a unique texture and appearance.
– This plant supports shade better than other succulents, making it ideal for growing indoors. However, it still needs bright light, not direct sun.
– This plant does not require frequent watering, as it can store water in its leaves. You should use the ‘soak and dry’ method of watering, which means that you should water the plant thoroughly until the water drains out of the pot, and then wait until the soil is completely dry before watering again.
– This plant requires porous and well-draining soil that can quickly get rid of excess water without retaining it or letting it collect. You can use a succulent potting mix that contains ingredients such as peat, sand, perlite, limestone, or coco coir.
– This plant does not need much fertilizing, as it can get most of the nutrients it needs from the soil. However, you can give it a boost by applying a diluted fertilizer for cacti and succulents every 2-3 weeks during the growing season.
– This plant does not need to be repotted often, as it prefers to be root-bound and can grow in small pots. However, you may need to repot it if the plant becomes too large for its pot, if the soil becomes too compacted, or if the roots start to rot.
– This plant can be propagated by using offsets, leaf cuttings, or seeds. Offsets are the easiest and fastest method, as they are small rosettes that grow from the base of the plant. Leaf cuttings are also simple, but they take longer to root and grow. Seeds are the most challenging method, as they require more care and patience.
– This plant is generally resistant to pests and diseases, but it can still be affected by some common problems, such as mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites, root rot, fungal infections, or sunburn. You can prevent these issues by providing the plant with the right conditions of light, water, soil, and air circulation.

If you’re looking for a succulent plant that has a unique texture and appearance, you might want to consider Gasteria Little Warty. This plant has small, wart-like bumps on its leaves, which give it a quirky charm and a bumpy personality. But don’t let its name fool you, this plant is not a pest, but a delight to grow and care for.

Gasteria Little Warty is a hybrid of Gasteria batesiana and Gasteria ‘Old Man Silver’, created by the Australian hybridizer David Cumming. It belongs to the Asphodelaceae family, along with other succulents such as Aloe and Haworthia. It is native to South Africa, where it grows in rocky habitats with partial shade.

This plant has a rosette shape, with long, pointed leaves that resemble the tongue of an ox. The leaves are dark green, with off-white to yellow mottled spots or blotches. The leaves are also covered with small, raised bumps, which give the plant its name and texture. The plant can grow up to 6 inches (15 cm) tall and 12 inches (30 cm) wide.

In the spring, this plant may produce racemes of pink-green tubular flowers on a stem. The flowers are attractive to hummingbirds and bees, but they are not very showy or fragrant. The plant may also produce offsets, which are small rosettes that grow from the base of the plant. These offsets can be used for propagation, or left to form a cluster of plants.

This plant is easy to care for, as it can tolerate heat and humidity very well. However, it is not frost-hardy and can be damaged by temperatures below 40°F (4°C). If you live in a cold area, you should bring the plant indoors during the winter or protect it from frost with a cover or a heater.

In this article, we’ll show you how to provide the optimal conditions, watering frequency, soil type, fertilizing schedule, repotting process, propagation methods, and common pests and diseases of this plant. By the end of this article, you’ll be able to enjoy the beauty and benefits of this succulent plant in your home or garden.

Do you want to know how to grow and care for this succulent plant with a bumpy personality? Read on to find out!

Optimal Conditions

little warty plant care

One of the most important aspects of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to provide it with the right conditions of light, temperature, and humidity. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Light: This plant supports shade better than other succulents, making it ideal for growing indoors. However, it still needs bright light, not direct sun. You can place it in a well-lit place, such as a windowsill, but avoid exposing it to harsh sunlight for too long. If you grow it outdoors, make sure it gets some shade during the hottest hours of the day. If you move the plant from indoors to outdoors, or vice versa, do it gradually to allow the plant to acclimate to the new environment and avoid stress or damage.
  • Temperature: This plant is native to South Africa and can tolerate heat and humidity very well. However, it is not frost-hardy and can be damaged by temperatures below 40°F (4°C). If you live in a cold area, you should bring the plant indoors during the winter or protect it from frost with a cover or a heater. In warmer weather, the plant may enjoy some fresh air and breeze, but avoid exposing it to strong winds or drafts that can dry out or damage the leaves.
  • Humidity: This plant does not need high humidity, as it can store water in its leaves. However, it can benefit from some occasional misting or spraying, especially in dry or hot conditions. You can also place the plant on a tray of pebbles and water, or near a humidifier, to increase the humidity around the plant. However, avoid wetting the leaves or the soil too much, as this can cause fungal infections or rot.
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Watering Frequency

Gasteria Little Warty being watered with a watering can

Another important aspect of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to water it properly and regularly. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Watering Method: The best way to water this plant is to use the ‘soak and dry’ method, which means that you should water the plant thoroughly until the water drains out of the pot, and then wait until the soil is completely dry before watering again. This way, you can ensure that the plant gets enough water, but not too much. You can use a watering can, a spray bottle, or a hose to water the plant, depending on the size and location of the pot. Make sure that the pot has a drainage hole at the bottom, or place some gravel or pebbles at the base of the pot, to prevent water from collecting or stagnating in the pot.
  • Watering Frequency: The frequency of watering this plant depends on the season, the climate, and the soil. In general, you may need to water the plant every 10-15 days in the summer, when the plant is actively growing and flowering, and once a month or less in the winter, when the plant is dormant and resting. However, you should always check the soil moisture before watering, by inserting your finger or a wooden stick into the soil, or by using a moisture meter. If the soil feels dry to the touch, or if the stick comes out clean, it means that the plant needs water. If the soil feels moist or wet, or if the stick comes out with soil attached, it means that the plant does not need water.
  • Signs of Overwatering and Underwatering: Overwatering and underwatering are the most common causes of problems for this plant, as they can affect the health and appearance of the plant. Here are some signs of overwatering and underwatering, and how to fix them:
Signs of OverwateringSigns of Underwatering
– The leaves become soft, mushy, or yellow– The leaves become wrinkled, shriveled, or brown
– The leaves drop off easily or fall apart– The leaves curl up or fold inward
– The roots become black, brown, or rotten– The roots become white, dry, or brittle
– The plant becomes susceptible to pests and diseases, such as mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites, root rot, or fungal infections– The plant becomes stunted, weak, or dormant

To fix overwatering, you should stop watering the plant immediately and let the soil dry out completely. You should also remove any damaged or diseased leaves or roots, and repot the plant in fresh soil if necessary. You should also reduce the frequency of watering and check the soil moisture before watering again.

To fix underwatering, you should water the plant thoroughly and deeply, and mist the leaves lightly to increase the humidity. You should also increase the frequency of watering and check the soil moisture regularly.

Soil Type

little warty plant care

The third important aspect of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to use the right type of soil for this plant. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Soil Requirements: This plant requires porous and well-draining soil that can quickly get rid of excess water without retaining it or letting it collect. This is because this plant is prone to root rot and fungal infections if the soil is too wet or compacted. You can use a succulent potting mix that contains ingredients such as peat, sand, perlite, limestone, or coco coir. These ingredients help to improve the drainage, aeration, and nutrient availability of the soil.
  • Soil Ingredients: You can either buy a commercial succulent potting mix from a garden center or online, or you can make your own soil mix by combining regular potting soil with some of these materials. A good ratio to follow is 2 parts of potting soil, 1 part of sand, and 1 part of perlite. You can also add some limestone or coco coir to adjust the pH and water retention of the soil. The ideal pH for this plant is between 6.0 and 7.0, which is slightly acidic to neutral. You can use a pH tester to measure the pH of the soil and add more or less limestone or coco coir accordingly.
  • Soil Preparation and Use: To prepare and use the soil for this plant, you should first fill a pot with some gravel or pebbles at the bottom, to create a drainage layer. Then, you should fill the pot with the soil mix, leaving some space at the top for watering. You should also make a hole in the center of the soil, where you will place the plant. You should gently remove the plant from its old pot, shake off any excess soil, and place it in the new pot. You should then fill the gap around the plant with more soil, and press it firmly to secure the plant. You should water the plant thoroughly after repotting, and then let the soil dry out completely before watering again.
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Fertilizing Schedule

Gasteria Little Warty being fertilized with a diluted fertilizer for cacti and succulents

The fourth important aspect of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to fertilize it occasionally and moderately. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Fertilizing Needs: This plant does not need much fertilizing, as it can get most of the nutrients it needs from the soil. However, you can give it a boost by applying a diluted fertilizer for cacti and succulents every 2-3 weeks during the growing season, which is usually from spring to fall. You should avoid fertilizing the plant during the dormant period, which is usually from winter to early spring, as this can cause the plant to grow weak or leggy.
  • Fertilizing Frequency: The frequency of fertilizing this plant depends on the type and strength of the fertilizer you use. In general, you should follow the instructions on the label of the fertilizer, and adjust the dosage and frequency according to the size and condition of the plant. You should also use a measuring spoon, a watering can, or a spray bottle to apply the fertilizer, depending on the form and concentration of the fertilizer. You should always water the plant before and after fertilizing, to prevent the fertilizer from burning the roots or the leaves.
  • Types of Fertilizer: There are different types of fertilizer that you can use for this plant, such as organic or synthetic, liquid or granular, cacti or succulent specific, etc. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, and you should choose the one that suits your preferences and needs. Here are some examples of each type:
Type of FertilizerAdvantagesDisadvantages
Organic– More natural and eco-friendly– More expensive and less available
– Provides a balanced and slow-release of nutrients– May have a strong or unpleasant smell
– Improves the soil quality and health– May attract pests or diseases
Synthetic– More cheap and readily available– More artificial and harmful
– Provides a fast and precise delivery of nutrients– May cause nutrient imbalance or toxicity
– Easy to use and store– May damage the soil quality and health
Liquid– More soluble and easy to apply– More diluted and frequent
– More uniform and consistent– More prone to evaporation or runoff
– More suitable for indoor plants– More likely to burn the roots or the leaves
Granular– More concentrated and long-lasting– More difficult and messy to apply
– More slow and controlled– More uneven and variable
– More suitable for outdoor plants– More likely to clog the soil or the drainage
Cacti or Succulent Specific– More tailored and appropriate for this plant– More limited and specialized
– More balanced and moderate– More expensive and less versatile
– More effective and efficient– May not suit the specific needs of this plant
  • Fertilizing Tips and Examples: To fertilize this plant properly and successfully, you should follow these tips and examples:
    • Use a fertilizer that has a low nitrogen and high potassium ratio, such as 5-10-10 or 10-20-20. This will promote healthy growth and flowering of the plant, without causing excessive leaf growth or legginess.
    • Dilute the fertilizer to half or a quarter of the recommended strength, to avoid overfertilizing or burning the plant. For example, if the label says to use 1 teaspoon of fertilizer per gallon of water, you can use 1/2 or 1/4 teaspoon instead.
    • Apply the fertilizer to the soil around the plant, not directly to the leaves or the stem, to prevent damage or staining. You can also use a spray bottle to mist the fertilizer solution on the leaves, but make sure to do it lightly and evenly, and avoid wetting the soil too much.
    • Fertilize the plant in the morning or evening, when the temperature is cooler and the sun is less intense, to prevent evaporation or scorching. You can also fertilize the plant on a cloudy or rainy day, to reduce the stress on the plant.

Repotting Process

little warty plant care

The fifth important aspect of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to repot it occasionally and carefully. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Repotting Needs: This plant does not need to be repotted often, as it prefers to be root-bound and can grow in small pots. However, you may need to repot it if the plant becomes too large for its pot, if the soil becomes too compacted, or if the roots start to rot. You should repot the plant in the spring, using a slightly larger pot and fresh soil. You should also remove any dead or damaged leaves or roots during the process.
  • Repotting Steps: To repot this plant, you should follow these steps:
    • Prepare the new pot and the soil, as described in the previous section. Make sure that the new pot has a drainage hole at the bottom, or place some gravel or pebbles at the base of the pot.
    • Gently remove the plant from its old pot, by turning the pot upside down and tapping or squeezing it. You can also use a knife or a spatula to loosen the soil around the edges of the pot, if necessary.
    • Shake off any excess soil from the roots, and inspect them for any signs of rot, disease, or damage. You can use a sharp knife or scissors to cut off any black, brown, or rotten roots, and a cotton swab dipped in alcohol or a fungicide to disinfect the cuts.
    • Place the plant in the center of the new pot, and fill the gap around the plant with the soil mix. Press the soil firmly to secure the plant, and leave some space at the top for watering.
    • Water the plant thoroughly after repotting, and then let the soil dry out completely before watering again.
  • Repotting Benefits: Repotting this plant has several benefits, such as:
    • Improving the drainage, aeration, and nutrient availability of the soil, which can enhance the health and growth of the plant.
    • Providing more space and comfort for the roots, which can prevent root rot and root bound.
    • Stimulating new growth and flowering of the plant, which can increase its beauty and charm.
  • Repotting Tips and Examples: To repot this plant safely and successfully, you should follow these tips and examples:
    • Use gloves, a sharp knife, and a clean pot, to avoid injuring yourself or the plant, or introducing any pests or diseases to the plant.
    • Choose a pot that is only slightly larger than the old pot, to avoid overpotting or drowning the plant. A good rule of thumb is to choose a pot that is 1-2 inches (2.5-5 cm) larger in diameter than the old pot.
    • Do not repot the plant too frequently or too infrequently, as this can stress or stunt the plant. A good time to repot the plant is when the roots start to show through the drainage hole, or when the soil becomes too hard or crumbly.
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Propagation Methods

Gasteria Little Warty being propagated by using offsets

The sixth important aspect of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to propagate it occasionally and easily. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Propagation Methods: This plant can be propagated by using offsets, leaf cuttings, or seeds. Each method has its own pros and cons, and you should choose the one that suits your preferences and needs. Here are some details of each method:
MethodProsCons
Offsets– Easiest and fastest method– May reduce the size and shape of the mother plant
– No need to wait for rooting or growing– May not produce enough offsets for propagation
– High success rate and identical to the mother plant– May damage the mother plant or the offsets during detachment
Leaf Cuttings– Simple and fun method– May take longer to root and grow
– No need to buy or collect seeds– May not root or grow at all
– Moderate success rate and similar to the mother plant– May lose the original texture or appearance of the leaf
Seeds– Most challenging and rewarding method– May require more care and patience
– No need to detach or cut anything– May have a low success rate and variable results
– Can produce new and unique varieties– May be hard to find or germinate
  • Propagation Steps: To propagate this plant by using each method, you should follow these steps:
    • Offsets:
      • Wait until the offsets are large enough to detach, usually when they have at least 4-5 leaves and some roots.
      • Gently twist or pull the offsets from the base of the mother plant, or use a knife or scissors to cut them off. You can also use a fork or a spoon to lift them from the soil, if necessary.
      • Let the offsets dry for a few days, until a callus forms over the cut or broken surface.
      • Plant the offsets in a pot with the same soil mix as the mother plant, and water them lightly. You can also dip the offsets in a rooting hormone or a fungicide before planting, to increase the chances of rooting and prevent infection.
      • Place the pot in a bright and warm place, but avoid direct sun. Keep the soil slightly moist, but not wet, and mist the leaves occasionally.
      • Wait for the offsets to root and grow, which may take a few weeks to a few months, depending on the size and condition of the offsets.
    • Leaf Cuttings:
      • Choose a healthy and mature leaf from the mother plant, preferably from the lower or outer part of the rosette.
      • Cut the leaf from the stem, leaving about 1 inch (2.5 cm) of the stem attached to the leaf. You can also use a knife or scissors to cut the leaf, or simply twist or snap the leaf off.
      • Let the leaf dry for a few days, until a callus forms over the cut or broken surface.
      • Plant the leaf in a pot with the same soil mix as the mother plant, and water it lightly. You can also dip the leaf in a rooting hormone or a fungicide before planting, to increase the chances of rooting and prevent infection.
      • Place the pot in a bright and warm place, but avoid direct sun. Keep the soil slightly moist, but not wet, and mist the leaf occasionally.
      • Wait for the leaf to root and grow, which may take a few months to a year, depending on the size and condition of the leaf. You may see some small roots or baby plants emerging from the base or the tip of the leaf.
    • Seeds:
      • Collect or buy some fresh and viable seeds from a reliable source, such as a garden center, an online store, or a fellow gardener. You can also harvest your own seeds from the flowers of the mother plant, if you are lucky enough to have them.
      • Sow the seeds in a pot with a fine and sterile soil mix, such as seed-starting mix or vermiculite. You can also use a tray or a container with a lid, to create a mini greenhouse effect.
      • Sprinkle the seeds evenly over the surface of the soil, and cover them lightly with a thin layer of soil or sand. You can also press the seeds gently into the soil, but do not bury them too deep.
      • Water the seeds lightly and carefully, using a spray bottle or a dropper. You can also soak the seeds in water for a few hours before sowing, to speed up the germination process.
      • Place the pot in a bright and warm place, but avoid direct sun. Keep the soil moist, but not wet, and mist the seeds regularly.
      • Wait for the seeds to germinate and grow, which may take a few weeks to a few months, depending on the quality and freshness of the seeds. You may see some tiny sprouts or seedlings emerging from the soil.
  • Propagation Success Rate and Time Frame: The success rate and time frame of propagating this plant by using each method depend on various factors, such as the size and condition of the offsets, leaves, or seeds, the temperature and humidity of the environment, the quality and drainage of the soil, the frequency and amount of watering, etc. In general, you can expect these results from each method:
MethodSuccess RateTime Frame
Offsets– High, up to 90% or more– Fast, from a few weeks to a few months
Leaf Cuttings– Moderate, up to 50% or more– Slow, from a few months to a year
Seeds– Low, up to 10% or more– Very slow, from a few months to a few years
  • Propagation Tips and Examples: To propagate this plant easily and effectively, you should follow these tips and examples:
    • Use a sterile tool, such as a knife, scissors, or tweezers, to detach or cut the offsets, leaves, or seeds, to avoid infection or contamination.
    • Use a moist medium, such as soil, sand, vermiculite, or perlite, to plant the offsets, leaves, or seeds, to provide moisture and support for the roots or the plants.
    • Use a warm and bright place, such as a windowsill, a greenhouse, or a grow light, to place the pot, tray, or container, to provide heat and light for the germination and growth of the offsets, leaves, or seeds.
    • Use a rooting hormone or a fungicide, such as powder, gel, or liquid, to dip or spray the offsets, leaves, or seeds, to increase the chances of rooting and prevent infection or rot.

Common Pests and Diseases

The seventh and final important aspect of caring for Gasteria Little Warty is to protect it from common pests and diseases. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Common Pests: This plant is generally resistant to pests, but it can still be infested by some common ones, such as mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites, etc. These pests can suck the sap or the juice from the leaves or the stems, causing them to become yellow, brown, or wilted. They can also leave behind some sticky or cottony substances, which can attract other pests or diseases. Here are some ways to identify, prevent, and treat these pests:
PestIdentificationPreventionTreatment
Mealybugs– Small, white, fluffy insects that look like cotton balls– Avoid overwatering or overfertilizing the plant– Remove them manually with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol or a toothbrush
– Usually found on the undersides or the joints of the leaves or the stems– Provide good air circulation and light for the plant– Spray the plant with a solution of water and soap, alcohol, or neem oil
– May cause the leaves or the stems to become yellow, distorted, or stunted– Quarantine or isolate the infected plant from other plants– Use a systemic or contact pesticide, such as imidacloprid or pyrethrin
Scale Insects– Small, brown, hard-shelled insects that look like scales– Avoid overwatering or overfertilizing the plant– Remove them manually with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol or a toothpick
– Usually found on the surfaces or the edges of the leaves or the stems– Provide good air circulation and light for the plant– Spray the plant with a solution of water and soap, alcohol, or neem oil
– May cause the leaves or the stems to become yellow, dry, or wilted– Quarantine or isolate the infected plant from other plants– Use a systemic or contact pesticide, such as imidacloprid or pyrethrin
Spider Mites– Tiny, red, spider-like insects that look like dust– Avoid underwatering or exposing the plant to high temperature or low humidity– Remove them manually with a cotton swab dipped in alcohol or a soft brush
– Usually found on the undersides or the tips of the leaves or the stems– Provide good air circulation and humidity for the plant– Spray the plant with a solution of water and soap, alcohol, or neem oil
– May cause the leaves or the stems to become yellow, speckled, or webbed– Quarantine or isolate the infected plant from other plants– Use a miticide or a pesticide, such as abamectin or bifenthrin
  • Common Diseases: This plant is generally resistant to diseases, but it can still be affected by some common ones, such as root rot, fungal infections, or sunburn. These diseases can damage the roots or the leaves of the plant, causing them to become black, brown, or mushy. They can also affect the health and appearance of the plant, making it weak or ugly. Here are some ways to identify, prevent, and treat these diseases:
DiseaseIdentificationPreventionTreatment
Root Rot– The roots become black, brown, or rotten– Avoid overwatering or using a poorly draining soil for the plant– Remove the plant from the pot and the soil, and inspect the roots for any signs of rot
– The plant becomes wilted, droopy, or limp– Provide good drainage and aeration for the soil– Cut off any damaged or diseased roots, and disinfect the cuts with alcohol or a fungicide
– The plant becomes susceptible to pests and diseases, such as mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites, etc.– Repot the plant in a fresh soil mix, and water it lightly
– Use a systemic or contact fungicide, such as thiophanate-methyl or mancozeb
Fungal Infections– The leaves or the stems develop black, brown, or white spots, patches, or rings– Avoid wetting the leaves or the soil too much, or exposing the plant to low light or high humidity– Remove any infected or dead leaves or stems, and dispose of them properly
– The plant becomes stunted, distorted, or discolored– Provide good air circulation and light for the plant– Spray the plant with a solution of water and soap, alcohol, or neem oil
– The plant becomes susceptible to pests and diseases, such as mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites, etc.– Quarantine or isolate the infected plant from other plants– Use a systemic or contact fungicide, such as thiophanate-methyl or mancozeb
Sunburn– The leaves or the stems develop brown, red, or white scorch marks or blisters– Avoid exposing the plant to direct or intense sun, especially in the summer or in the afternoon– Move the plant to a shadier or cooler place, or cover it with a shade cloth or a newspaper
– The plant becomes dry, brittle, or cracked– Acclimate the plant to the sun gradually and carefully, or use a sun filter or a screen– Water the plant more frequently and deeply, and mist the leaves lightly
– The plant becomes susceptible to pests and diseases, such as mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites, etc.– Provide good air circulation and humidity for the plant– Cut off any damaged or diseased leaves or stems, and disinfect the cuts with alcohol or a fungicide

Conclusion

We hope that this article has helped you learn how to grow and care for Gasteria Little Warty, the succulent plant with a bumpy personality. This plant is easy to care for, as long as you provide it with the optimal conditions, watering frequency, soil type, fertilizing schedule, repotting process, propagation methods, and common pests and diseases. By following these tips and examples, you can enjoy the beauty and benefits of this plant in your home or garden.

Are you ready to grow and care for your own Gasteria Little Warty? Let us know in the comments below!

About The Author

Samantha
Samantha

I'm Samantha, a plant enthusiast who has been growing plants for years. I believe that plants can make our lives better, both physically and mentally. I started growit.wiki to share my knowledge about how to grow plants. I want to help others enjoy the beauty and benefits of plants.

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