How Long Does It Take Seeds to Germinate? A Complete Guide for Gardeners

How Long Does It Take Seeds to Germinate? A Complete Guide for Gardeners

Key Takeaways
– Seed germination is the process of a seed sprouting into a plant. It is influenced by several factors, such as temperature, water, light, soil, and seed quality.
– You can germinate seeds faster by using different methods, such as soaking, scarifying, stratifying, chitting, and pre-sprouting. These methods help to soften the seed coat, activate the enzymes, and simulate the natural conditions.
– You can germinate seeds indoors by using different materials, such as pots, trays, peat pellets, paper towels, and plastic bags. This allows you to extend the growing season, protect the seeds from pests and diseases, and control the environment.
– You can germinate seeds outdoors by using different techniques, such as direct sowing, broadcasting, hill planting, and trench planting. This saves you space, time, and money, and lets the seeds adapt to the natural environment.
– You can use a seed germination chart to find out the average germination time, temperature, depth, and spacing of different seeds. This helps you to plan your gardening activities and optimize the germination process.

Table of Contents

Do you love gardening and growing your own plants from seeds? If so, you might have wondered how long does it take seeds to germinate. Seed germination is the process of a seed sprouting into a plant. It is one of the most exciting and rewarding stages of gardening, but also one of the most challenging and unpredictable.

Germinating seeds can be tricky, as different seeds have different requirements and preferences. Some seeds germinate quickly and easily, while others take longer and need more attention. Some seeds need warm and moist conditions, while others need cold and dry conditions. Some seeds need light, while others need darkness. Some seeds need to be buried deep, while others need to be barely covered.

How can you ensure that your seeds germinate successfully and grow into healthy and productive plants? How can you speed up the germination process and save time and resources? How can you germinate seeds indoors or outdoors, depending on your space and climate? How can you find out the optimal conditions and timing for each seed?

In this article, we will answer all these questions and more. We will provide you with a complete guide on how to germinate seeds faster, indoors, and outdoors. We will also provide you with a seed germination chart that shows the average germination time, temperature, depth, and spacing of different seeds. By the end of this article, you will have all the information and tips you need to germinate seeds like a pro. Let’s get started!

How to Germinate Seeds Faster

One of the most common questions that gardeners ask is how to germinate seeds faster. Germinating seeds faster can have many benefits, such as:

  • Saving time: You can start your plants earlier and harvest them sooner.
  • Saving space: You can use less space for germinating seeds and more space for growing plants.
  • Saving resources: You can use less water, soil, and fertilizer for germinating seeds and more for growing plants.
  • Increasing success rate: You can reduce the risk of losing seeds to pests, diseases, or environmental stress.
  • Increasing yield: You can grow more plants and produce more fruits, flowers, or herbs.

So, how can you germinate seeds faster? There are several methods that you can use to speed up the germination process, such as:

  • Soaking: This involves soaking the seeds in water for a few hours or overnight. This helps to soften the seed coat and allow water to enter the seed. This activates the enzymes and hormones that trigger germination. Soaking is especially effective for hard-coated seeds, such as beans, peas, corn, and squash.
  • Scarifying: This involves scratching, nicking, or cutting the seed coat with a knife, sandpaper, or nail file. This creates small openings in the seed coat and allows water and oxygen to enter the seed. This also activates the enzymes and hormones that trigger germination. Scarifying is especially effective for very hard-coated seeds, such as morning glory, lupine, and sweet pea.
  • Stratifying: This involves exposing the seeds to cold and moist conditions for a period of time. This simulates the natural winter conditions that some seeds need to break dormancy and germinate. Stratifying is especially effective for seeds that need cold stratification, such as apple, cherry, peach, and rose.
  • Chitting: This involves sprouting the seeds in a moist and warm environment before planting them. This can be done by placing the seeds on a damp paper towel, cotton wool, or coffee filter, and covering them with another damp material. The seeds should be kept in a warm and dark place, such as a plastic bag, a container, or a drawer. The seeds should be checked daily and moistened if needed. Once the seeds have developed a small root, they can be planted in soil. Chitting is especially effective for seeds that need warm stratification, such as tomato, pepper, and eggplant.
  • Pre-sprouting: This involves germinating the seeds in water before planting them. This can be done by placing the seeds in a glass jar or a plastic bottle filled with water. The jar or bottle should be covered with a lid or a cloth, and placed in a warm and dark place. The seeds should be checked daily and the water should be changed if it becomes cloudy. Once the seeds have developed a small root and a shoot, they can be planted in soil. Pre-sprouting is especially effective for seeds that need light to germinate, such as lettuce, celery, and parsley.

Here are some examples of seeds that benefit from each method and the optimal conditions for each method:

MethodSeedsConditions
SoakingBeans, peas, corn, squash, sunflower, nasturtium, etc.Soak for 2-24 hours in room temperature water.
ScarifyingMorning glory, lupine, sweet pea, nasturtium, etc.Scratch, nick, or cut the seed coat lightly and soak for 2-24 hours in room temperature water.
StratifyingApple, cherry, peach, rose, columbine, delphinium, etc.Mix the seeds with moist peat moss, vermiculite, or sand and refrigerate for 2-12 weeks.
ChittingTomato, pepper, eggplant, cucumber, melon, etc.Place the seeds on a damp paper towel, cotton wool, or coffee filter and cover with another damp material. Keep in a warm and dark place for 2-7 days.
Pre-sproutingLettuce, celery, parsley, basil, dill, etc.Place the seeds in a glass jar or a plastic bottle filled with water and cover with a lid or a cloth. Keep in a warm and dark place for 2-7 days.

These methods can help you germinate seeds faster, but they also come with some risks and challenges. Here are some tips and warnings on how to avoid common problems and mistakes when germinating seeds faster:

  • Do not soak or scarify the seeds for too long, as this can damage the seed or cause it to rot. Follow the recommended soaking time for each seed and check the seeds regularly for signs of germination.
  • Do not stratify the seeds for too long, as this can cause the seeds to lose viability or germinate prematurely. Follow the recommended stratification time for each seed and check the seeds regularly for signs of germination.
  • Do not chit or pre-sprout the seeds for too long, as this can cause the seeds to become leggy or weak. Follow the recommended germination time for each seed and plant the seeds as soon as they have a small root and a shoot.
  • Do not expose the seeds to extreme temperatures, as this can kill the seeds or inhibit germination. Keep the seeds in a consistent and optimal temperature range for each seed. Generally, most seeds germinate best between 18°C and 24°C (65°F and 75°F).
  • Do not let the seeds dry out or drown, as this can prevent germination or cause fungal infections. Keep the seeds moist but not soggy, and drain any excess water. Use clean and fresh water and materials to avoid contamination.
  • Do not plant the seeds too deep or too shallow, as this can affect germination and growth. Follow the recommended planting depth and spacing for each seed. Generally, most seeds should be planted at a depth of two to three times their size.
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By following these methods and tips, you can germinate seeds faster and enjoy the benefits of growing your own plants from seeds.

How to Germinate Seeds Indoors

How Long Does It Take Seeds to Germinate? A Complete Guide for Gardeners

Another common question that gardeners ask is how to germinate seeds indoors. Germinating seeds indoors can have many benefits, such as:

  • Extending the growing season: You can start your plants earlier than the outdoor planting date and get a head start on the season.
  • Protecting the seeds from pests and diseases: You can prevent the seeds from being eaten, damaged, or infected by insects, birds, rodents, or pathogens.
  • Controlling the environment: You can provide the optimal conditions for each seed, such as temperature, water, light, soil, and fertilizer.
  • Transplanting the seedlings to larger pots or outdoor beds when they are ready.

So, how can you germinate seeds indoors? There are several materials that you can use to germinate seeds indoors, such as:

  • Pots: These are the most common and versatile containers for germinating seeds indoors. You can use any type of pot, such as plastic, ceramic, clay, or metal, as long as it has drainage holes at the bottom. You can also use recycled materials, such as yogurt cups, egg cartons, or milk cartons, as long as you poke holes at the bottom. You can fill the pots with a good potting mix, such as peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, or compost. You can sow the seeds according to the recommended depth and spacing for each seed, and cover them lightly with soil. You can water the pots gently and keep them in a warm and bright place, such as a windowsill, a greenhouse, or a grow light. You can also cover the pots with a plastic wrap, a dome, or a cloche, to create a mini greenhouse and retain moisture and heat. You should remove the cover once the seeds germinate and provide adequate ventilation and air circulation.
  • Trays: These are shallow and wide containers that can hold many seeds at once. You can use any type of tray, such as plastic, metal, or wood, as long as it has drainage holes at the bottom. You can also use recycled materials, such as baking pans, pizza boxes, or shoe boxes, as long as you poke holes at the bottom. You can fill the trays with a thin layer of a good potting mix, such as peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, or compost. You can scatter the seeds evenly over the surface of the soil, and press them lightly into the soil. You can water the trays gently and keep them in a warm and bright place, such as a windowsill, a greenhouse, or a grow light. You can also cover the trays with a plastic wrap, a dome, or a cloche, to create a mini greenhouse and retain moisture and heat. You should remove the cover once the seeds germinate and provide adequate ventilation and air circulation. You should also thin out the seedlings to avoid overcrowding and transplant them to larger pots or outdoor beds when they have developed true leaves.
  • Peat pellets: These are compressed discs of peat moss that expand when soaked in water. They are convenient and easy to use, as they provide both the container and the soil for germinating seeds indoors. You can buy peat pellets from any garden center or online store, or make your own by cutting circles of peat moss and wrapping them in a thin layer of cheesecloth or paper towel. You can soak the peat pellets in water until they swell up and form a cylinder shape. You can place the peat pellets in a tray or a pot, and make a small hole in the center of each pellet. You can sow the seeds according to the recommended depth and spacing for each seed, and cover them lightly with soil. You can water the peat pellets gently and keep them in a warm and bright place, such as a windowsill, a greenhouse, or a grow light. You can also cover the peat pellets with a plastic wrap, a dome, or a cloche, to create a mini greenhouse and retain moisture and heat. You should remove the cover once the seeds germinate and provide adequate ventilation and air circulation. You can transplant the peat pellets to larger pots or outdoor beds when the seedlings are ready, without disturbing the roots.
  • Paper towels: These are simple and inexpensive materials that can be used to germinate seeds indoors. You can use any type of paper towel, such as white, brown, or recycled, as long as it is absorbent and biodegradable. You can fold the paper towel in half and moisten it with water. You can place the seeds on one half of the paper towel, and fold the other half over the seeds. You can place the paper towel in a plastic bag, a container, or a ziplock bag, and seal it. You can label the bag with the name and date of the seeds, and keep it in a warm and dark place, such as a drawer, a closet, or a cabinet. You can check the paper towel daily and moisten it if needed. You can also open the bag slightly to allow some air exchange. Once the seeds have developed a small root, you can plant them in soil, with the paper towel attached to the root. You can water the soil gently and keep it in a bright place, such as a windowsill, a greenhouse, or a grow light.
  • Plastic bags: These are another simple and inexpensive material that can be used to germinate seeds indoors. You can use any type of plastic bag, such as sandwich, freezer, or garbage, as long as it is clear and clean. You can fill the plastic bag with a moist potting mix, such as peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, or compost. You can sow the seeds according to the recommended depth and spacing for each seed, and cover them lightly with soil. You can seal the plastic bag and poke a few holes in it for air exchange. You can label the bag with the name and date of the seeds, and keep it in a warm and bright place, such as a windowsill, a greenhouse, or a grow light. You can check the plastic bag daily and moisten the soil if needed. You can also open the bag slightly to allow some ventilation and air circulation. Once the seeds have germinated and developed true leaves, you can transplant them to larger pots or outdoor beds.
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Here are some examples of seeds that are suitable for germinating indoors and the optimal conditions for each seed:

SeedMethodTemperatureLightDepthSpacing
TomatoPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
PepperPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag24-29°C (75-85°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
EggplantPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag24-29°C (75-85°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
CucumberPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright1.3 cm (1/2 inch)10 cm (4 inches)
MelonPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright1.3 cm (1/2 inch)10 cm (4 inches)
ZucchiniPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright1.3 cm (1/2 inch)10 cm (4 inches)
CabbagePot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
CauliflowerPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
OnionPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)2.5 cm (1 inch)
LeekPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)2.5 cm (1 inch)
CarrotPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)2.5 cm (1 inch)
LettucePot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag15-21°C (60-70°F)Bright0.3 cm (1/8 inch)2.5 cm (1 inch)
SpinachPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag15-21°C (60-70°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
BasilPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright0.3 cm (1/8 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
ParsleyPot, tray, peat pellet, paper towel, plastic bag18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)

These materials and tips can help you germinate seeds indoors and enjoy the benefits of growing your own plants from seeds.

How to Germinate Seeds Outdoors

Some gardeners prefer to germinate seeds outdoors, rather than indoors. Germinating seeds outdoors can have some benefits, such as:

  • Saving space: You don’t need to use any containers, trays, or pots for germinating seeds, and you can use the available space in your garden or yard.
  • Saving time: You don’t need to transplant the seedlings from indoors to outdoors, and you can avoid the hardening off process, which involves gradually exposing the seedlings to the outdoor conditions.
  • Saving money: You don’t need to buy any materials, such as potting mix, peat pellets, paper towels, or plastic bags, for germinating seeds, and you can use the natural soil and water in your garden or yard.
  • Adapting to the environment: You can let the seeds germinate and grow in the natural environment, and allow them to adjust to the climate, soil, and light conditions.

So, how can you germinate seeds outdoors? There are several techniques that you can use to germinate seeds outdoors, such as:

  • Direct sowing: This is the simplest and most common technique for germinating seeds outdoors. It involves sowing the seeds directly in the soil where you want them to grow. You can prepare the soil by loosening it, removing any weeds, rocks, or debris, and adding some compost or fertilizer. You can sow the seeds according to the recommended depth and spacing for each seed, and cover them lightly with soil. You can water the soil gently and keep it moist but not soggy. You can also mulch the soil with straw, leaves, or grass clippings, to retain moisture and prevent weeds. You can protect the seeds from birds, insects, or rodents, by covering them with a net, a cage, or a cloche. You can also mark the sowing area with a label, a stake, or a string, to remember where you planted the seeds.
  • Broadcasting: This is a technique for germinating seeds outdoors that involves scattering the seeds over a large area of soil. This is suitable for seeds that are very small, such as poppy, daisy, or wildflower, or seeds that are meant to grow in clusters, such as lettuce, spinach, or carrot. You can prepare the soil by loosening it, removing any weeds, rocks, or debris, and adding some compost or fertilizer. You can scatter the seeds evenly over the surface of the soil, and press them lightly into the soil. You can water the soil gently and keep it moist but not soggy. You can also mulch the soil with straw, leaves, or grass clippings, to retain moisture and prevent weeds. You can protect the seeds from birds, insects, or rodents, by covering them with a net, a cage, or a cloche. You can also mark the sowing area with a label, a stake, or a string, to remember where you planted the seeds.
  • Hill planting: This is a technique for germinating seeds outdoors that involves planting the seeds in small mounds of soil. This is suitable for seeds that need more space, such as squash, pumpkin, or melon, or seeds that need more drainage, such as cucumber, zucchini, or watermelon. You can prepare the soil by loosening it, removing any weeds, rocks, or debris, and adding some compost or fertilizer. You can form small hills of soil, about 30 cm (12 inches) in diameter and 15 cm (6 inches) in height, and space them about 1-2 m (3-6 feet) apart. You can sow the seeds according to the recommended depth and spacing for each seed, and cover them lightly with soil. You can water the hills gently and keep them moist but not soggy. You can also mulch the hills with straw, leaves, or grass clippings, to retain moisture and prevent weeds. You can protect the seeds from birds, insects, or rodents, by covering them with a net, a cage, or a cloche. You can also mark the hills with a label, a stake, or a string, to remember where you planted the seeds.
  • Trench planting: This is a technique for germinating seeds outdoors that involves planting the seeds in small furrows of soil. This is suitable for seeds that need more depth, such as peas, beans, or corn, or seeds that need more support, such as sunflower, hollyhock, or delphinium. You can prepare the soil by loosening it, removing any weeds, rocks, or debris, and adding some compost or fertilizer. You can dig small trenches of soil, about 5-10 cm (2-4 inches) deep and 30-60 cm (12-24 inches) apart. You can sow the seeds according to the recommended depth and spacing for each seed, and cover them lightly with soil. You can water the trenches gently and keep them moist but not soggy. You can also mulch the trenches with straw, leaves, or grass clippings, to retain moisture and prevent weeds. You can protect the seeds from birds, insects, or rodents, by covering them with a net, a cage, or a cloche. You can also mark the trenches with a label, a stake, or a string, to remember where you planted the seeds.
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Here are some examples of seeds that are suitable for germinating outdoors and the optimal conditions for each seed:

SeedTechniqueTemperatureLightDepthSpacing
SquashHill planting21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)1-2 m (3-6 feet)
PumpkinHill planting21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)1-2 m (3-6 feet)
MelonHill planting21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)1-2 m (3-6 feet)
CucumberHill planting21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)1-2 m (3-6 feet)
ZucchiniHill planting21-27°C (70-80°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)1-2 m (3-6 feet)
PeasTrench planting15-21°C (60-70°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
BeansTrench planting18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
CornTrench planting18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
SunflowerTrench planting18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
HollyhockTrench planting18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
DelphiniumTrench planting18-24°C (65-75°F)Bright2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
PoppyBroadcasting15-21°C (60-70°F)BrightSurfaceScatter
DaisyBroadcasting15-21°C (60-70°F)BrightSurfaceScatter
WildflowerBroadcasting15-21°C (60-70°F)BrightSurfaceScatter
LettuceBroadcasting15-21°C (60-70°F)BrightSurfaceScatter
SpinachBroadcasting15-21°C (60-70°F)BrightSurfaceScatter
CarrotBroadcasting15-21°C (60-70°F)BrightSurfaceScatter

These techniques and tips can help you germinate seeds outdoors and enjoy the benefits of growing your own plants from seeds.

How Long Does It Take Seeds to Germinate? A Seed Germination Chart

how long does it take seeds to germinate

One of the most useful tools that gardeners can use to germinate seeds successfully is a seed germination chart. A seed germination chart is a table that shows the average germination time, temperature, depth, and spacing of different seeds. A seed germination chart can help you to:

  • Plan your gardening activities: You can use the seed germination chart to determine when to sow your seeds, indoors or outdoors, according to the season and the climate. You can also use the seed germination chart to estimate how long it will take for your seeds to germinate and grow into plants.
  • Optimize the germination process: You can use the seed germination chart to provide the optimal conditions for each seed, such as temperature, water, light, soil, and fertilizer. You can also use the seed germination chart to avoid common problems and mistakes, such as planting the seeds too deep or too shallow, or exposing them to extreme temperatures or light levels.
  • Compare different seeds: You can use the seed germination chart to compare the germination time, temperature, depth, and spacing of different seeds. You can also use the seed germination chart to choose the best seeds for your gardening goals and preferences. You can also use the seed germination chart to mix and match different seeds that have similar or complementary characteristics.

Here is a seed germination chart that covers the most common vegetables, flowers, herbs, and fruits that gardeners grow from seeds. The chart shows the average germination time, temperature, depth, and spacing of each seed, based on the information from various sources . However, you should keep in mind that these values are not absolute, and they may vary depending on the specific conditions and varieties of seeds. Therefore, you should always check the seed packet, test the soil, and monitor the germination progress, to ensure the best results.

SeedGermination TimeGermination TemperaturePlanting DepthPlanting Spacing
Artichoke10-20 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)90 cm (36 inches)
Arugula3-7 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Asparagus14-21 days18-24°C (65-75°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Basil5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)0.3 cm (1/8 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Bean3-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Beet7-16 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Broccoli3-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Brussels Sprout5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Cabbage3-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Carrot9-20 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)2.5 cm (1 inch)
Cauliflower5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Celery10-21 days18-24°C (65-75°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Chard7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Chives10-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Cilantro7-10 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Collard5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Corn4-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Cucumber4-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Dill7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Eggplant8-16 days24-29°C (75-85°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)45 cm (18 inches)
Endive7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Fennel7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Kale5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Kohlrabi5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Leek10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Lettuce4-10 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.3 cm (1/8 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Melon5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)45 cm (18 inches)
Mustard4-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Okra7-14 days24-29°C (75-85°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Onion8-18 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Oregano7-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Parsley14-21 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Parsnip14-21 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Pea3-10 days15-21°C (60-70°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Pepper9-16 days24-29°C (75-85°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Pumpkin5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)90 cm (36 inches)
Radish3-7 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)2.5 cm (1 inch)
Rosemary14-21 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)45 cm (18 inches)
Rutabaga5-10 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Sage10-21 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Spinach5-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Squash5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)90 cm (36 inches)
Thyme14-28 days18-24°C (65-75°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Tomato5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)45 cm (18 inches)
Turnip3-10 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)5 cm (2 inches)
Watermelon5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)90 cm (36 inches)
Zucchini5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)90 cm (36 inches)
Alyssum7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Aster7-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.3 cm (1/8 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Bachelor’s Button7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Calendula7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Carnation10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Cosmos5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Dahlia7-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Dianthus10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Gaillardia10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Geranium10-21 days21-27°C (70-80°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Hollyhock10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)45 cm (18 inches)
Impatiens14-21 days21-27°C (70-80°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Larkspur14-21 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Lavender14-28 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Marigold5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Morning Glory7-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Nasturtium7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Pansy10-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)0.3 cm (1/8 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Petunia7-14 days21-27°C (70-80°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Phlox10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Poppy7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Salvia10-21 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Snapdragon10-14 days18-24°C (65-75°F)Surface15 cm (6 inches)
Sunflower5-10 days18-24°C (65-75°F)2.5 cm (1 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Sweet Pea7-14 days15-21°C (60-70°F)1.3 cm (1/2 inch)15 cm (6 inches)
Verbena14-28 days18-24°C (65-75°F)0.3 cm (1/8 inch)30 cm (12 inches)
Zinnia5-10 days21-27°C (70-80°F)0.6 cm (1/4 inch)15 cm (6 inches)

How can you use this seed germination chart effectively? Here are some tips and warnings on how to read and interpret the seed germination chart and how to adjust it according to the specific conditions and varieties of seeds:

  • The germination time is the average number of days it takes for the seeds to sprout, from the day of sowing. However, this can vary depending on the temperature, water, light, soil, and seed quality. Some seeds may germinate faster or slower than the average time. You should check the seeds regularly for signs of germination, such as a small root or a shoot emerging from the soil.
  • The germination temperature is the optimal temperature range for the seeds to germinate. However, this can vary depending on the season, the climate, and the location. Some seeds may germinate in higher or lower temperatures than the optimal range. You should use a thermometer to measure the temperature of the soil or the air, and adjust it accordingly. You can use a heating mat, a grow light, a greenhouse, or a cloche, to increase the temperature, or a shade cloth, a fan, a cooler, or a refrigerator, to decrease the temperature.
  • The planting depth is the recommended distance that the seeds should be buried in the soil. However, this can vary depending on the size, shape, and type of the seeds. Some seeds may need to be planted deeper or shallower than the recommended depth. You should use a ruler or a finger to measure the depth of the soil, and cover the seeds lightly with soil. You can also use a dibber, a pencil, or a stick, to make holes in the soil for the seeds.
  • The planting spacing is the recommended distance that the seeds or the seedlings should be apart from each other. However, this can vary depending on the growth habit, the size, and the type of the plants. Some plants may need more or less space than the recommended spacing. You should use a ruler or a tape measure to measure the distance between the seeds or the seedlings, and thin out or transplant them if needed. You can also use a string, a marker, or a label, to mark the spacing for the seeds or the seedlings.

By using this seed germination chart and these tips and warnings, you can germinate seeds successfully and grow healthy and productive plants.

Conclusion

Germinating seeds is one of the most rewarding and enjoyable aspects of gardening. It allows you to grow your own plants from seeds, and enjoy the fruits, flowers, or herbs of your labor. However, germinating seeds can also be challenging and frustrating, as different seeds have different requirements and preferences. How can you ensure that your seeds germinate successfully and grow into healthy and productive plants?

In this article, we have provided you with a complete guide on how to germinate seeds faster, indoors, and outdoors. We have also provided you with a seed germination chart that shows the average germination time, temperature, depth, and spacing of different seeds. By following this guide and using this chart, you can germinate seeds like a pro and enjoy the benefits of growing your own plants from seeds.

We hope you have found this article helpful and informative. If you have any questions, comments, or feedback, please feel free to leave them below. We would love to hear from you and learn from your experience. Thank you for reading and happy gardening!

About The Author

Samantha
Samantha

I'm Samantha, a plant enthusiast who has been growing plants for years. I believe that plants can make our lives better, both physically and mentally. I started growit.wiki to share my knowledge about how to grow plants. I want to help others enjoy the beauty and benefits of plants.

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